Pro and Anti groups protest face to face at Harvard Square in U.S. over India’s Citizenship law

Boston (United States) — The anti and pro groups of Indian protestors came face to face on Sunday at Boston’s Harvard Square in United States over the controversial Citizenship law passed by the government led by PM Narendra Modi.

The fervent groups were raising the slogans pro and against the controversial law, according to a video shared by one of the protestors.

The video shows a group of anti-bill protestors walking towards the Square, while a handful of pro-bill protestors were already present at the location to demonstrate their support towards the controversial bill.

The anti-bill protestors raised the slogans including “Leke Rahenge Azadi”“We’ll grab the freedom”, “Sune Modi, Hum Ladke lenge Azadi”“Listen Modi, we’ll fight for the freedom”, “Love live the Freedom”, “Love live the Revolution”, etc.

They held the placards with the messages including “Revoke CAA”, and “Modi – a Great Divider”.

While the pro-group raised the slogans including “PoK se Azadi”“Freedom from Pakistan Occupied Kashmir”, “Jihadism se Azadi”“Freedom from the Jihadism”, etc. which were described to be irrelevant to the theme of the protest, as they gathered to clear the misconception of the citizenship law rather to provoke the opponents.

However, both the groups abided by the U.S. law of protesting. They marched towards their respective places quite opposite to each other and exercised their right to raise their concerns towards the Citizenship law.

The Indian government has witnessed violent protests against the Citizenship law which was passed by Modi government in December 2019, which eases the path for non-Muslims in the neighboring Muslim-majority nations of Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh to gain Indian citizenship.

If CAA combined with a proposed national register of citizens (NRC), critics fear it will discriminate against minority Muslims in India and damage India’s secular constitution.

The bill also drew criticism in United Nations, terming it as “fundamentally discriminating”.