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No harms of COVID vaccine on fertility, a study suggests while refuting the infertility rumors

2 mins read

by Jaafar Siddiqui

There’s no evidence to prove that the antibodies created by COVID vaccine cause infertility.

According to a recent study, COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t affect fertility and one’s ability to have a family in the future. The internet is filled with doubts about COVID vaccines, people are questioning and doubting the legitimacy of vaccines.

“As a parent it’s my job to protect my child. If there was a genuine risk that they could die of COVID, I would consider giving them a vaccine for it. But when there is a genuine risk, they could be harmed from the vaccine, it’s a big ‘no’ from me”, said a concerned anti-vaccine father on twitter.

COVID vaccines are falsely linked to infertility because research do talk about COVID-19 virus affecting men’s fertility due to the virus entering the testes cells which are vulnerable to the SARS- COV-2 hence lowering the sperm count of a man and affecting the fertility.

“Though it’s clear the vaccines don’t cause infertility, it’s possible that severe COVID-19 could influence sperm count if someone has a prolonged fever”, said Dr. Sigal Klipstein, chair of the ethics committee at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

“The possible risk factors of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) infection on fertility comes from the abundance of angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme‐2 (ACE2), receptor entry of the virus, on testes, a reduction in important sex hormone ratios and COVID‐19‐associated fever”, according to a National Center for Biotechnology Information. The virus can also affect the spermatogenesis process — the male body’s operation of generating sperms.

However, the entire theory of COVID vaccines causing infertility was based on an idea that one of the spike proteins in COVID-19 virus and in the vaccine are the same, but they are not. It has been proven in research that they are distinct from each other. The COVID vaccine works by training our bodies to develop antibodies to fight against the virus and there’s no evidence to prove that the antibodies created by COVID vaccine cause infertility.

In fact, the COVID vaccine can protect one’s fertility by protecting it from severe COVID symptoms.

“Getting COVID can be potentially detrimental to one’s fertility, and getting the vaccine is safe and could even protect fertility by protecting you against the severe effects of COVID disease,” said Jesse Ory, urology fellow in Infertility/Andrology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The benefit of COVID vaccine can be observed in the UK. 32.2 million, almost 48.4% of the United Kingdom’s population have been fully vaccinated. In the last week UK has seen rise in delta variant of Corona virus with more than 75,000 cases confirmed by genetic analysis and British scientists estimated the variant is 40% to 80% more transmissible than the Alpha variant yet there hasn’t been a rise in hospitalization. According to the data, Over 60s, around 90% of whom are fully vaccinated, make up only 4% of cases.

“Delta variant has dominated in the UK, COVID cases rising. But hospitalizations are not rising meaning vaccines work. Fear mongering doesn’t”, said Faheem Younus, MD VP/CQO/Chief of Infectious Diseases on twitter.

Jaafar Siddiqui earned Bachelors in Journalism from the University of Hertfordshire — United Kingdom. He writes for The Milli Chronicle on Business, Politics, and Culture.